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By A. Blaser (auth.), Albrecht Blaser (eds.)

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Extra info for Natural Language at the Computer: Scientific Symposium on Syntax and Semantics for Text Processing and Man-Machine-Communication Held on the Occasion of the 20th Anniversary of the Science Center Heidelberg of IBM Germany Heidelberg, FRG, February 25, 198

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Control of the OPC subject, on the other hand, is not obligatory. Consider how the OPC subjects are controlled in (14). (14) a. b. Bambij was brought [e? to read ej to the children]. I brought this winej over [e, to enjoy ej with our dinner]. In both (14a) and (14b) the empty object position in the purpose clause is controlled by a matrix NP. In (14a), however, there is no matrix NP to control the purpose clause subject, yet we understand that someone or other will do the reading. In (14b), there is a matrix NP, I, that could control the purpose clause subject Yet (as noted in Bach (1982», I could certainly utter (14b) at the front door of someone who has invited me over for dinner without fearing that my host would understand me to be saying that I intended to drink the whole bottle myself.

In Chapter III we will review several of these kinds of differences. One by one, each of these differences may allow various kinds of explanations. I will argue in Chapter III, however, that. together, these differences form a kind of 'constellation' of properties that call for a unified explanation. The unified explanation I will propose is that purpose clauses are syntactically not fully clausal. I will argue that purpose clauses are simply bare VPs; VPs that are not contained in IPs, let alone CPs.

2. IOC, PC, andRecursion IOC-adjunction appears to be recursive, while PC-adjunction does not. Consider fIrst the IOC example in (55). The clumsiness of the sentences in (55), in which Fred is apparently controlling the subject position of all the 53 EX1ERNAL SYNI'AX IOC, seems to be proportional to their length. (55) a b. Fred started a food co-op in order to save on his grocery biUs. Fred started a food co-op in order to save on his grocery bills in order to pay his phone bills. Fred started a food co-op in order to save on his grocery biUs in order to pay his phone bills in order to be able to call his girlfriend from his home.

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